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  • Ah, toast. A staple of breakfasts, poor students, busy people in need of a bite, and of course, millennials everywhere (but only when topped with avocado). Just a slice of bread, heated by the magic of a toaster until it becomes warm, filling, crunchy, and the perfect way to get all kinds of delicious toppings into your mouth. Simple.

    Less simple, of course, is the other kind of toast. The kind where someone has to get up in front of friends and family and say a few words. Ideally, words that are kind, funny, interesting, illuminating…and not too long. So in honor of National Toast Day on February 23, we’ve rounded up some of the most memorable toasts in pop culture, whether they're good, bad, or awful!

  • If you haven’t picked up a copy of Edgar Cantero’s Meddling Kids, then please, for the sake of your childhood, go grab a copy today. The premise of Cantero’s novel is brilliant and simple: what would Scooby and the gang be like today if they were all grown up? The answer? According to Cantero, they'd be—well—let’s just say they aren't the Saturday morning goofballs we remember. In this parallel universe, Cantero’s take on our favorite cartoon sleuths is twisted, hilarious, and at times, delightfully disturbing. We absolutely loved it! Which got us thinking, what other series from our childhoods should be adapted for an adult audience?

  • Editor's Note: To finish out 2018, we're revisiting some of our favorite blog posts from the past year. This post was originally published on 4/3/18. 


    They say best friends are never more than a phone call away. But It’s 2018, so we should probably revise that to “never more than a FaceTime, Snapchat, or VR sesh away.” Even then, these fancy new methods of keeping in touch really only apply if you exist in the same dimension as your bestie, which to be frank, might not always be the case. Before passing away, Stephen Hawking co-published a final paper on the possibility of a multiverse, prompting us to wonder, can we really even say who our true best friends are? For all we know, they might not even exist in the same time or space. We tested the theory, and sure enough, in the case of these pop culture and literary icons, their perfect matches weren’t even found in the same story, let alone universe.

  • The long-anticipated reboot She-Ra and the Princess of Power is now on Netflix, led by showrunner Noelle Stevenson. Think that name sounds familiar? She’s the creator of one of our all-time favorite graphic novels, Nimona, and co-creator of the badass middle grade comic series Lumberjanes. If you’re on our feminism-meets-pop-culture wavelength – and we hope you are – you might be thinking, “Oh hey! I know a bunch of other rad women whose work would thrive on Netflix!” Well, come on board, nerds. Because we were thinking the exact same thing.

  • Crazy Ex-Girlfriend has returned for its final season and before you say anything, we’re definitely not crying. You’re crying. We’re sending off this perfect bonkers series with some book recommendations. Because that’s how we show love, okay?

  • Bojack Horseman returns to Netflix for a fifth season, and fans can’t wait to dive back into a world where animals wear clothes, walk upright, and have existential crises…just like the rest of us! Bojack Horseman is an animation that is also a gut punch of a series, managing to balance the absurd with the kind of moments that get us right in the feels as the washed-up Bojack tries to find a little happiness in Hollywoo. It’s also a surprisingly bookish show (especially for one so doused in sex, drugs, and despair), in no small part because it begins with Bojack attempting to write his memoirs. However, this is far from the only book that pops up in the series…or that we would like to see as part of season five!

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