We use cookies on our website to personalize your experience, to conduct analytics, and to provide targeted online advertising. For more information and to opt-out of cookies, please see our Privacy Policy
Close Mobile Menu

Photo by Jaymantri from Pexels

Today is National Send a Card to a Friend Day. While cards are all fine and dandy, it can sometimes be hard to find the card that says exactly what you are looking for. After all, what can really be said in such a small amount of space. So instead of just sending a card, why not send a book to go along with it? There are so many great books in the world, there is bound to be something for everybody in your life. To help you down the road a bit, we at Quirk wanted to give a few suggestions of possible books to send to your friends.

 

Supergods by Grant Morrison

Grant Morrison has long been a household name for comic book fans. With a massive list of published stories, Morrison’s insane level of prolific writing is one that makes it almost impossible to read comics which haven’t at least in part been touched by his concepts. His non-fiction book Supergods is half comics history and half memoir. Combined with Morrison’s ever present editorial wit, this is a quick read even at 400+ pages with no dialogue.

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

 

 

Siri, Who Am I? by Sam Tschida

To define who you are in your life can be a difficult task. So many people struggle to find their true selves and as the curation of identity via social media has become more and more prevalent, it is becoming even harder to come to terms with true identity. In Sam Tschida’s novel, Siri, Who Am I? The search for identity gets even more complex when amnesia is at play. For poor Mia, her social media accounts are the only thing she has to go off of while she figures out who she is and what caused her to wake up in a hospital with no idea about her identity. This one is perfect for your Instagram obsessed friend.

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

 

 

A Spell for Chameleon by Piers Anthony

For those fantasy loving friends out there, the Xanth novels by Piers Anthony are a must read. Grounded solidly in high fantasy, A Spell for Chameleon follows Bink, a young man who is struggling with the fact that he is the only person in all of the land who has no magical abilities. Forced out of the of Xanth into the Mundane world, Bink must learn to survive in a harsh society nothing like his own.

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

 

 

The Karate Kid, art by Kim Smith, based on the film written by Robert Mark Kamen and Directed by John G. Avildsen

Sometimes it is nice to get something for the kiddos. While parents all across the United States are busy reveling in the nostalgia of Cobra Kai, a bunch of kids have likely been left in the dust about who Mr. Miyagi, Daniel LaRusso and Johnny Lawrence even are. As part of the great Pop Classics series, The Karate Kid adaptation is a perfect primer for getting to learn the characters and the basic plot of the story necessary to enjoy the show with mom and dad.

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

 

 

Sleeping Beauties by Stephen and Owen King

Don’t forget your friend who lives in the dark spaces and craves all things grim and gritty. Even horror fans need some love in February, and for those people, Stephen and Owen King’s co-written novel would be a glorious read. When the women of the world begin to fall asleep and not wake up from a strange condition, it is up to a small band of men and still awake women to find out what is happening and how they can fix it. More of a thriller than some of King’s other works, this piece still has some of the dark psychological stuff that will make fans of his work happy.  

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound


A Book You May Enjoy