Here at Quirk, we’re always on the lookout for strikingly unconventional manuscripts and book proposals. A well-written novel with an off-the-wall editorial premise? That’s Quirk. A playful cookbook or craft book with cool photography or crazy illustrations? That’s Quirk, too. We publish across a broad range of categories—always with the goal of delivering innovative books to discerning readers.

Put more simply, we publish books that are smart, original, cool, and fun.

How can I submit my idea to Quirk?

The easiest way to submit your idea is to e-mail a query letter to one of our editors. The query letter should be a short description of your project. Try to limit your letter to a single page. If you have sample chapters, go ahead and include them.

You can also mail materials directly to our office. If you would like a reply, please include a self-addressed stamped envelope. If you want your materials returned, please include adequate postage.

Our mailing address:

Quirk Books
215 Church Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

Who should I contact?

See our “Who’s Who” page (under “Our Company”) for detailed information about our editors and their interests—or follow these helpful guidelines:

Jason Rekulak (Publisher) is interested in smart and innovative adult fiction (genre and literary); he's particularly fond of mysteries and science fiction but he'll read just about anything. On the nonfiction side, he enjoys popular history, popular science, and popular culture/humor. He also oversees Quirk's growing list of children's books. 








Email: jason at


Tiffany Hill (Editor) is interested in concept-driven nonfiction and how-to books with a strong voice and innovative approach. Definitely query her if you have:

  1. A fun, unexpected twist on a traditional cookbook, like Booze CakesOld Man Drinks, or Breakfast for Dinner.
  2. A project-based craft book (especially knitting, crochet, or sewing) with a strong, irresistible focus, like Creepy Cute Crochet.
  3. A how-to book that approaches its lifestyle topic (parenthood, relationships, pets, etc.) from an unusual perspective, like Baby Owner's Manual or The Geek's Guide to Dating.
  4. A book that's organized or physically structured in a creative, useful way. If you've put something interesting into a flow chart or arranged it by color, for example, Tiffany wants to hear about it.






Email: tiffany at


Rick Chillot (Writer/Editor) is interested in fiction and non-fiction, for adults or kids, that intersects with pop culture, sci-fi, comics and superheroes, comedy, and/or parody. Especially likes projects with potential for a prominent visual or graphic component. Would love to bring a graphic novel to the Quirk list. And like everyone else here, longs to find something so awesome and unique that it fits only into a category by itself. (Warning: Everyone claims their book idea “isn’t like anything else,” but only rarely is it true.)







Email: rick at


Blair Thornburgh (Editor) is interested in high-concept fiction and non-fiction for teens and adults with a humorous, geeky, and/or feminist bent. In YA fiction, she’s seeking manuscripts with a strong, preferably comedic voice and a fresh premise (no dystopias, please). In adult fiction, she's looking for next-gen chick lit, genre fiction that's light and accessible to mainstream readers, and anything with a playful high concept. In non-fiction, she's looking for projects involving women and feminism, geeky stuff and pop culture, or anything that will appeal to quote-unquote millennials. She is actively seeking authors from diverse backgrounds. Definitely query her if you have:

  1. High-concept YA with a strong voice—think geeky Meg Cabot
  2. Fiction (adult or YA) that incorporates lots of voices or stylistic devices (à la Dear Committee Members or Where'd You Go, Bernadette)
  3. A love story with an unusual narrative form, like Rainbow Rowell’s Attachments, Jennifer E. Smith’s The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight, or Daniel Handler’s Why We Broke Up
  4. Genre fiction that's self-aware, like Galaxy Quest or Cabin in the Woods in book form
  5. Any novel that plays with narrative form, especially involving the internet—a "TTYL" for the next generation







Email: blair at


Please only query one of us. And please don’t call us to follow up. We try our best to reply to all queries, and of course we always respond if we’re interested.