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  • Image by Social Butterfly from Pixabay

    New Year's Eve this year looked very different than it would have a hundred years ago. No midnight selfies to post on Instagram, no club-hopping between venues with a $50 cover and too many drunk people, no last-minute Tinder dates to try and find someone to kiss when the clock strikes twelve. Despite these new ways to celebrate, New Year’s Eve has always been an important night to mark in the calendar, and people have always done something to celebrate. A more sedated ball, a house party (not the kind with red solo cups), a family evening around the fire, or some champagne with a few friends have been the go-to for centuries. And while cultural norms around drinking come and go, one thing is for certain: our favorite authors have no doubt dealt with some serious New Year’s hangovers at one time or another.

    But how would these classic literary figures deal with the first day of the year if they were in their prime this winter? We have some thoughts.

  • The holidays can be difficult. After all, one cannot choose their family, and it takes time before all the complex carbohydrates and copious amounts of egg nog to do their work and put everyone to sleep. What do you talk about in meantime that won’t set off a shouting match? Books, television and movies, of course!

  • We all know the story of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol; it’s been retold and adapted enough times that it’s become part of popular culture. Certainly a great deal of its longevity has to do with Dickens particular blend of wit and pathos. But what if he wasn’t the one who penned the classic? How would A Christmas Carol read if some other authors took a crack at it?

  • Baking shows! Be they war over cupcakes or beautifully British bunting-bundles, we cannot get enough of them. There’s just something scintillating about watching folks mix their ingredients as best they can, only to leave their concoction to the capricious whims of an oven’s heat. But what if there was an added challenge to all of this rolled-dough rigmarole? What if one of the judges was famed fictional foodie and cannibal killer Hannibal Lecter?

  • Now that Kenneth Brannagh’s adaptation of Murder on the Orient Express has steamed into theaters, it’s high time to draw attention to the many knock-offs and also-rans that cropped up in the wake of Agatha Christie’s 1934 hit novel. When you have such a rich concept as “locked room mystery, but on a moving vehicle,” it’s not hard to imagine others exploiting it.

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