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We all know that books are the best gifts a person could ever give or receive. (It’s an undisputed fact. Please don’t try to fight us on this.) But what if you want to get a jump start on gifts for the kids in your life? Don’t fret! We have you covered with our very favorite holiday-themed books for kids, books that will have them smiling all month long – and for years to come.   

 

Home Alone and Home Alone 2: Lost in New York by Kim Smith

Not only do these books send us on the most wonderful of nostalgia trips – Macaulay Culkin, anyone? – they also feature the most incredible illustrations by Kim Smith. (We’re big fans. Can you tell?) So take a trip back to the 1980s, a whimsical time when having your house burglarized or losing your child in a major metropolitan city was lighthearted material for a Christmas movie. We love the fact that these books are fun for the whole family: an introduction to Kevin McCallister for the kids, packed with laugh-out-loud moments for the adults. Kevin!

Buy the books:

Home AloneAmazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Book a Million | Target

Home Alone 2: Lost in New YorkAmazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Books a Million | Target

 

 

Dear Santa, Love Rachel Rosenstein by Amanda Peet, Andrea Troyer, and Christine Davenier

We love holiday books that speak to interfaith families and Jewish kids who want their own way to get into the Christmas spirit. Dear Santa, Love Rachel Rosenstein is a heartwarming book for any child who’s ever asked why they don’t have a Christmas tree. It’s a beautiful examination of what it means to be Jewish during this winter holiday season, following a precocious Rachel from her letter to Santa to a covert operation of decorating the house for Christmas and beyond! It’s as funny as it is sobering – and the perfect gift for any child on your list.

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Books a Million | Target

 

 

Hanukkah Bear by Eric A. Kimmel and Mike Wohnoutka

When Bubba Brayna, who’s lived a long life at 97-years-old, opens the door and welcomes a bear into her home, she doesn’t know that she’s just invited a wild animal in. With her decreased vision and hearing, she’s mistaken this bear for her rabbi, who was promised to her home that evening to eat her famous latkes. As Bubba and the bear carry out Hanukkah traditions, readers absorb her empathy and lack of prejudice. She’s happy to share in these holiday traditions with whoever takes the time and shows the interest. It’s a beautiful story to share with kids of all backgrounds, especially young children who are learning about the menorah for the first time.

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Books a Million

 

 

The Day Santa Stopped Believing in Harold by Maureen Fergus and Cale Atkinson

Like the title suggests, this is the perfect picture book for kids who are starting to doubt Santa’s existence – or who have stopped believing altogether. It’s a silly turn of events: Harold has stopped believing in Santa? Well, Santa certainly doesn’t have to believe in this Santa kid, does he? Gorgeous artwork by Cale Atkinson accompanies this non-traditional Christmas story, injecting a large dose of humor into the holiday season.

Buy the book:

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Books a Million | Target

 

 

The Crayons’ Christmas by Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers

In this touching Christmas edition of The Crayons series, the crayons share in each other’s holiday traditions, including decorating the house, caroling, and sitting by the fire with a hot cup of cocoa. (A dangerous endeavor for any waxy being.) As an added bonus, this book comes with envelopes filled with games and Christmas ornaments. It’s truly the gift that keeps on giving!

Buy the Book:

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Books a Million | Target


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Danielle Mohlman's picture

Danielle Mohlman

Danielle Mohlman is a playwright, bookworm, and library connoisseur. You can find her on Twitter and Tumblr. (She has a lot to say.) And on Instagram. (She never foodstagrams.) When she grows up, she wants to be Leslie Knope.