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  • [Photo by Larisa Birta on Unsplash]

    With National Film Score Day back this April 3rd, film scores are on the mind. Last year we matched movie scores with book recommendations so readers could not only transport themselves via words but via music as well. This year we’re trying something different and imagining which film composers would create fitting OSTs (original soundtracks) for Quirk book adaptations.

    Quirk has had a handful of books adapted for the big screen, most notably Tim Burton’s Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children and 2016’s Pride & Prejudice & Zombies, and there’s even an Amazon TV series in the works for The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires. But what about those that haven't made it to the screen yet?

  • [Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash]

    Things should be looking up the further we traverse into 2021 and although select locations are opening up to visitors, many factors like historical site visitation hours and international travel are limited and make for a poor vacation season. This can be hard on any age group but especially for younger children who are experiencing what can only be described as a unique school year.

    Now’s a good time to remind young readers that though physical travel may not be an option, one of the best ways to vicariously experience another place, culture, time, or experience is through books, and these select series are great ways for young readers to vacation to another space, even if it’s only virtually.

  • [Photo by Pixabay on Pexels]

    This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, Quirk Books may earn a commission.

    The quack attack is back! Disney+ is bringing back the world of The Mighty Ducks with an all new show: The Mighty Ducks: Game Changers. And we are 100% here for it! To celebrate, we’re looking at some of our favorite ‘90s movies – and pairing them with some of our favorite contemporary books. So, without further ado…quack, quack, quack.

  • [Photo by Engin Akyurt from Pexels]

    This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, Quirk Books may earn a commission.

    Not too long ago it was pretty easy for indie, foreign, or streamed films to fly under the Oscar radar, but this past year has been, simply put, a weird one, causing major shifts in movie theater releases and a heavy focus on accessible movie streaming. And although this year hasn’t been the kindest, it’s nice to know that movies that historically could have been ignored by the Academy have rightfully earned their place as nominees for the 2021 Oscars.

    To celebrate an odd but fruitful year of film, we’re pairing select Oscars nominees with some book recommendations. If you’ve already buzzed through these movies and are itching for something similar to hold you off until the winners are announced on April 25th, give one of these paired books a go!

  • Lou Ottens, the inventor who blessed us with the cassette tape, died earlier this month at the age of 94. Thanks to his creation, people around the world have collected their favorite songs as a gift for friends and lovers. A mixtape was one of the coolest things you could give or receive in the 1980s and ‘90s. Though the technology has given way to the online streaming playlist, the idea remains the same: collect your favorite tunes around a theme and share them with people you love.

    Thanks to its billing as “Toy Story meets Stranger Things,” my middle grade novel Spark and the League of Ursus (and its sequel) practically demands its own mixtape. I share it with you here.

  • Image by skalekar1992 from Pixabay

    “They f**k you up, your mum and dad.  

    They may not mean to, but they do…”

    Philip Larkin’s "This Be The Verse" gets straight to the point. Parents, no matter how hard they try, are only human and mess up sometimes when it comes to raising children. But Larkin’s pithy poem isn’t just about laying blame, but understanding. Parents aren’t perfect, and Forgive Mom and Dad Day encourages kids to see the ones who raised them not just as parents, but as people.

    So this March, which literary parents might deserve a little forgiveness? Are these moms and dads actually sympathetic people, struggling to do their best and failing despite good intentions? Or perhaps, have these book-based parents gone so fictionally far that there’s just no forgiveness possible?

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