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  • Dragons are one of the most popular mythological creatures in literature and have been enchanting readers for centuries. They're everywhere, from the ancient dragons of Greek, Roman, Norse, and Chinese mythology to the more modern dragons of today’s epic fantasies. They’re so popular that there’s even an official Appreciate A Dragon Day every January to “encourage you to explore the cultural significance of the dragon in your society and history."

    Here’s a look at the ten best dragons in literature.

  • The literary incarnations of Zelda Fitzgerald are, perhaps, the original Manic Pixie Dream Girl. Though the term wasn’t coined by critic Nathan Rabin until over 50 years after Zelda’s death, the various characters based on her bring life, spirit, wealth and power to their chosen suitors.

  • The rise of the anti-hero has been long heralded in pop culture, especially in the era of Peak TV. The Tony Sopranos and Walter Whites of television have battled their inner demons as morally ambiguous protagonists. While this is a less common archetype in recent science fiction and fantasy films, there are a few who step forward to test their level of morality.

  • Star Trek Beyond is out in theaters today! Captain Kirk and Spock are back to save the galaxy from evil. But what if the greatest sci-fi baddies of all time faced off against the Star Trek Enterprise crew?

     

  • Star Trek, like the two earliest Enterprises (the USS and the NX-01), began with a narrow focus on an elite crew of scientists and military men.  These ships were more similar to a modern military vessel, spartan and only consisting of active duty officers.  Yet as time went on, as the United Federation of Planets and its exploratory arm, Starfleet, continued to develop, the Enterprise broadened into a concurrent scientific ship and family home – and with this evolution, required to deal with the complications and dramas so inherent to any family home. 

    One of the most complicated relationships throughout Star Trek, explored throughout centuries and across the galaxies, is that of  the legacies of fathers and their children.  From Sarek, struggling to understand the effects of Spock’s human emotions to Jake Sisko, searching to separate his identity from that of his father while isolated on a deep space Starfleet base.  Yet amongst the multitude of Starfleet officers with children, there are some particularly notable Starfleet officers, at both extreme ends of parenting.  Here we have not the best and worst Starfleet officers (indeed, one of the worst fathers on this list is arguably the best Starfleet officer of all time,) but a judgement as to their personal lives.  Who are the best and worst fathers in Starfleet?

    Worst: James T. Kirk

  • Star Trek has been and will always be a cultural phenomenon. The new set of movies has brought a whole new generation of viewers into the fandom and has sparked the imaginations of those who dream of “the final frontier.” While we at Quirk are incredibly excited about the next film, Star Trek: Beyond, we must still think to the future when all of the stars of the will no longer be able to take time out of their busy schedules for a massive ensemble piece. That leaves us with the question of what takes place next. How about a new younger cast for a Next Generation film.

     

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