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Literary Yarns may have focused more on the bookish side of geekery, but with a few modifications, Prince Hamlet can be turned into another popular (or UNpopular, depending on how you see it) murderous prince and Elizabeth Bennet can be changed from a quick-witted intellectual to a ruthless zombie huntress. Read on to find out how!

 

From Prince Hamlet to King Joffrey: Shakespeare’s Hamlet rivals George R. R. Martin’s Game of Thrones in terms of trying to kill off the entire cast as fast as possible. With Game of Thrones season seven underway, how about we take a look back at one of our favorite love-to-hate monarchs from the earlier seasons? Using the pattern for Hamlet from Literary Yarns, you can bring back everyone’s favorite trigger-happy little lion, along with one of his favorite trophies. Don’t put him on a stage though, he’s been known to…choke on his lines.

 

Ned-pop, anyone?

 

For Joffrey: Follow the pattern for Prince Hamlet’s head, body, and crown, but substitute the black yarn on the body with a royal red.

 

For the dead Ned head (ha!):

Materials:

  • Size E crochet hook 
  • Worsted weight yarn in cream and light brown
  • Embroidery floss in black and light brown (light brown yarn may also be used)
  • Red fabric paint Fiberfill Toothpick or barbecue skewer
  • Optional: size B or C hook to help stitch on the hair

Follow the instructions for the skull, but start with cream yarn instead of white. Using the cream yarn, follow the instructions for rounds 1-4 as written, then use the following instructions for the remainder of the head:

Round 5: Sc 14. {14}
Round 6: Sc 1, dec 2, sc 4, dec 1, sc 3. {11}
Lightly stuff the head with fiberfill.
Round 7: Sc 2, dec 1, sc 1, changing to light brown yarn. In front loops only sc 5, changing to cream yarn. In both loops, sc 1. {10}
Round 8: In back loops only, dec 5. {5}
Fasten off and close off the skull (see instructions on page 9).

 

Oh, Ned. You gave yourself too much of a HEAD start in your Lannister investigation.

 

The light brown portion of the head will be Ned's beard. Using black embroidery floss, sew on two X's two rows above the beard for classic dead eyes. Cut several 4" strands of light brown embroidery floss or yarn. Fold the strands in half, and using cowhitch knots, stitch Ned's hair around the head (using a size C or B crochet hook can help with this!). Place the skewer or toothpick through the head. Heavily apply red fabric paint to the bottom of the head and dab more paint around the rest of the head as you see fit! Apply more paint to the skewer/toothpick. Stick the head into Joffrey's side so he can show off his uh...bizarre display of mercy.

 

From Elizabeth Bennet, Vanquisher of Arrogant Men to Elizabeth Bennet, Vanquisher of the Undead:

Elizabeth Bennet. She’s bright-eyed, well-mannered, and has a sharp wit and good sensibility about her.

 

 

But if there’s one thing sharper than her wit, it’s her dagger. With the two combined, Elizabeth Bennet the zombie huntress is able to fend off zombies while putting haughty noblemen in their place.

 

 

Using the pattern for Elizabeth Bennet from Literary Yarns, Lizzy can easily be turned into a Pride Prejudice & Zombies-edition Lizzie by adding an extra accessory and a few dabs of fabric paint! Using grey and bronze colored felt, you can use the following template to make a dagger for little Lizzy:

 

Glue the completed dagger to her body, and using some red fabric paint, dab on a zombie splatter onto the dagger’s blade and a few extra splotches onto her dress. But not TOO many. Cleaning up will be a chore if she’s careless with her zombie hunting.


Quirk Tested. Reader Approved.

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Cindy Wang

Cindy Wang is a healthcare professional by day and a crochet ninja by night. She blogs at geekyhooker.wordpress.com, where she is known for amigurumi superheroes, movie characters, monsters, and more. Before San Diego Comic-Con (and sometimes other comic cons), she hides crocheted superheroes around the city for people to find. She tags them with her contact information, and excited finders send in photos of their adoptees at home.