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Feeling a little peculiar?

Of all the opulent antiquities we’ve spotted in the trailer for Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, there’s one that we’d most love to pocket for ourselves: Miss Peregine’s signature pocket watch and watch fob (the chain that it hangs on). But unless you’ve found your way to her home yourself (and if you have, please invite us over!) the best way to pocket a beautiful watch like hers is by making your own one of a kind watch fob.

 

Watch fobs were designed to compliment fashion - one end of the chain fastens through a buttonhole while the other connects to the watch as it rests in your pocket. Not only is this an ingenious way to keep your watch safe and access it at a moment’s notice, it’s an excellent opportunity to accessorize with style!

This watch fob makes excellent use of items you’re likely to have in your junk drawer already, and can connect to pocket or pendant watches of almost any size.

First, gather your materials:

  • Pocket watch - any size will do, though very large pocket watches or especially small pendant watches are the most peculiar-looking.

  • Chain - a leftover costume jewelry chain necklace works perfectly, even if the clasp is broken.

  • Earring, pendant, or charm - who doesn’t have a broken pendant or lone earring rolling around at the bottom of their jewelry box?

  • Loop-backed button or toggle - the loop on the back of the button is key, and you only need one.

  • Needle-nosed pliers - perfect for working with jump rings and delicate chains.

  • Jump rings - these wire rings are perfect for attaching the decoration to your chain or securing the clasp of your chain if it’s broken.

Secure your watch to the chain

Secure your pocket watch to the chain quickly and easily with a lark’s head knot (also called a cow hitch, ring hitch, lanyard hitch, bale sling hitch, tag knot, deadeye hitch, or running eye - knots have the best names!). To tie the knot, fold the chain in half and thread the point of the fold through the bale of the pocket watch. Once the chain is threaded through, the threaded portion should form a loop. Pull the two ends of the chain through this loop, and there you have it! A simple and secure lark’s head knot.

Clasp the chain through the loop-backed button

Using an old necklace chain? Fasten the clasp around the loop on the back of the button. Using some scrap chain, or a chain that has a broken clasp? Use a jump ring to fasten the links in place: using your pliers, open the ring just enough to thread the ends of the chain and the button’s loop onto it. Once the button and both ends are threaded onto the jump ring, use your pliers to close the ring.

Connect your decoration to the chain

Grab your favorite broken or matchless bauble and a jump ring. Using your pliers, remove any unnecessary hardware (like the earring hook or post), and insert a jump ring in its place. Place both lengths of chain into the same jump ring, and then use your pliers to secure the ring shut. Your sparkling decoration should now hang gracefully from and slide easily along the length of chain from your watch to the button.

Button on and enjoy!

Here’s the trick to wearing your watch fob: button it on from the inside. That’s right, button it on the wrong side! Push the button through so that the front of it faces your body and can’t be seen, and then button your vest as usual. Tuck your watch into your pocket, let your pretty bauble shine, and enjoy a very peculiar day!

Watches with ornate fobs were typically worn to fancier affairs, but they are sure to dress up and add a bit of whimsy to any outfit. For even more whimsy, check out Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (she was, after all, the inspiration for this project) and be sure to catch the movie adaptation coming to theaters this fall!

 

Quirk Tested. Reader Approved.

Margaret Dunham's picture

Margaret Dunham

Margaret’s earliest memory is trying to get a plastic Playskool car up to 88 miles per hour. She lives in a beautiful DIY fortress about a stone’s throw from Peter Parker’s old digs in Queens. By day she writes full time for the City of New York and local nonprofit heroes; by night she spends her time crafting, writing, and kung fu fighting. Read all about it on her site The Fearless Gluestick.